BARTEC INSIGHT - November 2013, Überblick



Beschreibung

The BARTEC INSIGHT customer magazine provides an in-depth look into the world of explosion protection in compact form.

You can find out about exciting news from the world of BARTEC, about the diverse people that make up our business, current trends and how BARTEC is active as a world market leader in explosion protection wherever our customers are.


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ANTARES AT WORK

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BARTEC

INSIGHT

No.1 / 2013

ADHESIVES MANUFACTURING AT HENKEL

INSIDE

BUILDING BRIDGES

INTERNATIONAL

BARTEC CONQUERS AUSTRALIA

INTELLIGENT

5 EXPLOSION PROTECTION MYTHS

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BARTEC

PROTECTS.

High-tech solutions from BARTEC are used
around the world. As the world market leader
in explosion protection, BARTEC continuously
invests in new technologies and new markets.

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Dear Reader,

EDITORIAL

It is finally here. You are holding the first

edition of the BARTEC INSIGHT customer

magazine, which provides an in-depth look

into the world of explosion protection in

compact form. You can find out about excit-

ing news from the world of BARTEC, about

the diverse people that make up our busi-

ness, current trends and how BARTEC is

active as a world market leader in explosion

protection wherever our customers are.

In addition to user reports, new develop-

ments and trends in the sector, our CEO Dr

Ralf Köster will tell us in an interview about

BARTEC’s future strategic orientation in

explosion protection, as this is about more

than just the perfect technology. It’s about

the commitment that goes into new devel-

opments like the ANTARES remote I/O sys-

tem to successfully implement individual

customer solutions.

Do you think we have struck the right

chord with our new magazine? Please get in

touch; we look forward to receiving your

feedback!

Yours sincerely,

CONTENTS

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/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

Cover illustration: Frank W

eidenfelder

, Rose Pistola / Photo editorial: Heike Rost

PAGE 16

A HELPING HAND

BARTEC SPONSORS

INTERNSHIPS ABROAD

12 INTERNATIONAL

BARTEC conquers Australia

14 INSIDE

Jan Rieks Zonderman:

Building bridges

16  A HELPING HAND

BARTEC sponsors

internships abroad

18  AND FINALLY

03 EDITORIAL

04  QUESTION TIME

Dr Ralf Köster: How clear goals can

help us become a “hidden champion”

06 INTELLIGENT

The 5 most stubborn

myths in explosion protection

08  USER REPORTS

ANTARES in the dispersion and

solvent adhesives industry

11  JUST THE TOOL!

Innovative products as

reliable aids

Daniela Deubel
Director Global Corporate Communications

daniela.deubel@bartec.de

3

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

EDITORIAL · CONTENTS

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FROM FIAT

TO FERRARI

A medium-sized business needs clear goals to become

a "hidden champion". CEO Dr Ralf Köster on the path

from Baden-Württemberg to the global market

Interview: Marius Schaub /// Photos: Heike Rost

4

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

QUESTION TIME

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Dr Köster, you have been at the helm of

BARTEC for almost 10 years. What was

your most important goal when you started?

First of all, I wanted to work with the team

to take the business global. Back then, I

called all the developers together and asked

them to look out of the window into the car

park. I asked them “How many Ferraris do

you see down there?” The answer, of course,

was none at all. But back then, BARTEC’s

products were like Ferraris! Top technology,

the best of the best, but at a premium price

and therefore not suited to the internation-

al market. That is what I wanted to change.

Over many years, we became more interna-

tionally focused and created a modular sys-

tem for the requirements of the various

markets, whilst retaining our cutting-edge

technology. If someone wants to have a Fer-

rari, then we are of course still happy to give

them that. But we are also capable of deliv-

ering a Fiat.

What does the reorganisation mean in terms

of figures?

Back then, we made revenue of around

€120 million, today it’s well over €300 mil-

lion. We are seeing double-digit growth,

have 10 production plants around the world

and almost 40 sales subsidiaries. That has

also had an effect on the number of staff.

When I started it was around 1,000 – today

we have 1,600. The future of this company

is international. But we are also entering

the next phase in the individual countries

and expanding our local structures. For ex-

ample in China, we now have our own pro-

duction sites and a sales subsidiary with

offices at various regional sites. The number

of staff is growing there too. In other words,

when we enter a market, we develop in

terms of breadth as well.

Can your customers expect a wide product

range as well as an expanding sales network?

We want to stay in the explosion protection

industry. Within this sector, we will how-

ever significantly expand our product range

through both our own developments and

through acquisitions.

So oil and gas will remain the core sector

going forward?

This sector accounts for around 60 per cent

of our revenue, and for a good reason. We

offer products that accompany the entire

process, from exploration across the entire

process industry to logistics and storage.

We are the only ones capable of such a wide

remit. But it is very important for us to not

just be active in the oil and gas sector. We

are involved in sectors like pharmaceuticals,

chemicals and nuclear power, as well as

some more unusual areas. These include

measurement and analysis systems for logis-

tics in the dairy industry. Today we can jus-

tifiably claim that we are the number one

global market leader in this area.

How does that come about? Dairy is not

exactly an obvious area for explosion pro-

tection.

That’s true, but using our measurement and

data collection systems for liquids like heat-

ing oil or kerosene as a basis, we have adapt-

ed the technology for the needs of dairy

logistics, whilst the technical construction

remains the same. That can only be done

with a modular system ...

... and with solutions?

Solutions have made a sustainable contri-

bution to our strong international growth.

Before, we used to build switches, control-

lers and little lamps. But thanks to our en-

gineering prowess, these components

quickly became solutions. In fact, we have

already gone one step further. For several

years, we have been offering so-called en-

gineered solutions. These are very specific

solutions which we construct together with

the customer’s engineers. Over the years,

we have built a lot of trust doing this. It’s

not as if you can just walk up to the world’s

big oil and gas companies, ring the doorbell

and say “I’d like to offer you something.”

Does that mean that BARTEC doesn’t need

to ring to the doorbell any more?

For many of our customers, we have estab-

lished ourselves as an expert, long-term

partner. You have to realise that on a drill-

ing platform or refinery, there are billions

in investments at stake. Among other things,

we also produce mission-critical technology,

things that are essential for the safety of staff,

of the environment and of the equipment.

Finally, I’d like to ask about how you view

the market. Do you foresee growth or more

difficult times?
Our customers work long-term with systems

that were a one-off decision for them. For this

reason, they think carefully when selecting

a provider, therefore the market for safety

technology is very demanding. But I see this

as an advantage for BARTEC. This is because

our knowledge of the sector and our compre-

hensive expertise in technology and solu-

tions give us a major competitive advantage.

Furthermore, if there is a downturn in one

sector, our very wide product range also

helps us, as if one product is not doing very

well, we can always compensate. Automation,

control and connection equipment, analyz-

ers and measurement technology, electric

trace heating, communication systems, mo-

tors, precipitation protection – we are the

only ones who can cover such a wide spec-

trum from a single source. That is what sup-

ports our international growth.

Marius Schaub in conversation with Dr. Ralf Köster.

5

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

QUESTION TIME

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Due to the clear mobility advantage, wire-

less data transmission is becoming increas-

ingly important. But aside from sparks,

flames and hot surfaces, electromagnetic

waves are also potential sources of ignition

and are therefore subject to certain limits.

The ignition limits for receiver structures

for continually high-frequency sources are

described in DIN EN 60079-0. Radio sig-

nals therefore present a fundamental igni-

tion risk in areas at risk of explosions. Ig-

nition can occur, for example, when a

metallic structure unintentionally acts as a

receiver antenna in an explosive atmos-

phere and under electromagnetic radiation.

In optic cables, light is focused on a very

small point. If the cable is damaged, this

concentration of light can heat up a surface

or particles. The same thing can also occur

with a separated plug connection. An optic

ray can therefore present an actual explo-

sion risk. For that reason, it must be en-

sured that a certain radiation strength or

energy value for each surface is not exceed-

ed. In addition, the release of too much light

must also be prevented, regardless of the

scattering. This makes it necessary to have

specially built and certified transmitters

and receivers, for example, or a certain ca-

ble routing. On the one hand, this makes it

possible to ensure protection through the

inherently safe optical radiation – a safe

system is a protected system. On the other

hand, the protected optical radiation forms

another type of protection. The optical ra-

diation is contained and therefore cannot

escape into the explosive area.

The market for explosion pro-
tection has strong potential,
as the need for safe and inno-
vative solutions is constantly
growing. But it is in precisely
those areas that there is the
greatest explosion risk where
there are important conditions
to consider. Among the pecu-
liarities in explosion protec-
tion, there are many myths.
We have summarised the five
most stubborn ones here.

Radio signals are
not a potential source
of ignition

Fibre optic cables
do not need any
explosion protection

1

2

THE 5 MOST

STUBBORN

MYTHS

OF EXPLOSION

PROTECTION

6

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

INTELLIGENT

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It is however possible to use passively pow-

ered RFID tags (consisting of a micro-con-

troller, an antenna and an energy store, i.e.

without an integrated battery) even without

certification in line with the directive 94/9/

EC. This only applies, however, when they

are only temporarily exposed to the explo-

sive area. The reason for this is that RFID

tags can be exposed to electromagnetic ra-

diation and that electrical ignition energy

can be generated by electrostatic charging

or through heating. That is why data trans-

fers should only occur outside these danger

zones. It’s different for the so-called active

RFID tags, which are fitted with an inte-

grated battery. This kind of unit is classified

as completely electrical equipment and

therefore does require certification for use

in explosive areas.

Usually, fieldbus installations use so-called

isolating device couplers, better known as

fieldbus barriers. The bus itself is operated

without an energy limit, i.e. it is not inher-

ently safe. This is where the “high power

trunk” principle comes to the fore. The ex-i

isolation occurs locally on the ex-i field de-

vices by connecting them via couplers. In

theory, up to 32 ex-i field devices can be

incorporated into one segment by using up

to twelve-channel couplers. The limiting

factor here is not so much the explosion

protection, but rather much more the per-

formance of the host systems.

According to definitions, explosive atmos-

pheres do not occur as often in zone 2 as in

zone 0 and zone 1. It is however vital to en-

sure suitable safety measures even for rare-

ly occurring explosive atmospheres. Com-

mon devices for general industrial use do

not provide the necessary protection or do

not display the required protection against

ignition. Permitted solutions that meet the

standards are only possible with equipment

intended for use in explosion zone 2.

No explosion protection
approval is needed
for passive RFID tags

For bus-powered field-
buses, only a certain
number of inherently safe
devices can be connec-
ted for each segment in
the explosion area

Zone 2 requires
no explosion protection

4

5

3

7

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

INTELLIGENT

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Photos: Henkel / BAR

TEC

ANTARES AT WORK

In its small component metering in the explosive

area, Henkel is using BARTEC's remote I/O system

ANTARES for the first time in its dispersion and

solvent adhesives operation in Düsseldorf.

8

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

USER REPORTS

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enkel became a manufacturer of

adhesives somewhat uninten-

tionally when, in 1923, a shortage

of packaging adhesives threatened to hinder

the labelling of products. Today, the global

player is a world market leader in a number

of sectors, including adhesives, sealants

and surface technology. One of the recipes

for success is the use of tried and tested

standards. By using the remote I/O system

ANTARES from BARTEC in its small com-

ponent metering, the tech team deviated

from its previous line. The high flexibility,

simple handling and above all the missing

galvanic isolation as a result of the Ex e con-

nection area on the head module forced the

technicians to think differently. Another

convincing argument was the fact that the

system could be easily expanded both in the

explosive area and outside it.

Robert Ciupka is responsible for the com-

plete EMC planning, scheduling and main-

tenance along with another colleague in the

operation at Henkel. The tech team do a lot

of the construction and scheduling them-

selves in the dispersion and solvent adhe-

sives operation in Düsseldorf. Around 120

staff are responsible for the smooth manu-

facture of the largely water-based adhesives

H

containing solvents for wall and floor cov-

ers for professional tradesmen. The facility

has a high-bay store installed for a total of

12 containers. The system in the explosive

area, which meters the raw materials via a

weighing container and output distributor

into the eight large stirring units, is con-

trolled by BARTEC’s remote I/O solution

ANTARES, designed for the explosive area.

All the components, from the light cabinets

to the initiator responses, analogue values

of the positioners and pressure measure-

ments, pulse counters for flow measure-

ments, pumps or overflow prevention de-

vices, can be directly connected through

the system and coupled to the process con-

trol system via PROFIBUS.

Standing out

from the crowd

Ciupka built a prototype system in his office

which could be easily parameterized. The first

tests already showed that ANTARES is ex-

tremely flexible. “The configuration can be

changed very quickly, meaning that goals can

be achieved in a short time. The software

ANTARES Designer provides a graphical

representation of which components need

RAIL CONTROL UNIT:

POWER SUPPLY UNIT

AND COMMUNICATION

MODULE

CONNECTION BOX FOR POWER SUPPLY

AND BUS INTERFACE

I/O MODULES

THE TECHNOLOGY

IN DETAIL

• PROFINET AND ETHERNET IP
FOR THE EXPLOSIVE AREA

• NO EXPLOSION APPROVAL
FOR HOUSING REQUIRED

• NO EXTERNAL SAFETY
BARRIERS OR ISOLATION
AMPLIFIERS NECESSARY

• SAME BUS TOPOLOGY AS IN
NON-EXPLOSIVE AREA

• INTEGRATED ETHERNET SWITCH
ENABLES CONSTRUCTION OF
RING TOPOLOGIES

• POWERFUL POWER SUPPLY UNIT
SUPPLIES UP TO 32 I/O MODULES

• REAL SYSTEM REDUNDANCY
WITH PROFIBUS DP

• DESIGNER SOFTWARE WITH
INTUITIVE USER INTERFACE

Experience

ANTARES,

the new bus

technology,

online:

9

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

USER REPORTS

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With the flexible remote I/O solution, system

builders can now freely plan and design their

own systems for the first time.

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/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

to be assembled and it is impossible to make

any major mistakes anywhere,” reports the

engineer. After this, the data are loaded into

the head-end. If there has been a miscon-

nection, an error message appears imme-

diately and also shows where the error  has

occurred.

Thanks to its flexible system approval,

ANTARES has fulfilled the most important

criterion for Ciupka and his team: “We have

to remain highly flexible at all times. Today

we are building systems in one way and to-

morrow in another.” It emerged, for example,

in the middle of a small component metering

project that a few more pumps and a tank

emptying system were required and that the

concept and scheduling had to be altered. In

other systems, this means that the customer

has to cancel the order and re-order every-

thing if not enough reserve I/Os had been

planned for in advance, as the approval is rig-

idly coupled to the complete system consisting

of the housing, isolating assemblies and re-

mote I/O.

Quicker to the goal

If a certain number of I/Os is planned for, it

is not long until the limits of conventional

systems are reached if further expansion is

desired. This means that an additional

head-end must be procured. “There are al-

ways problems, because I have to retain the

galvanic isolation,” say Ciupka of the lim-

itations. “That was a decisive point for me,

as here in the facility we always have to keep

expanding and converting.” With ANTARES

from BARTEC, this is different. Here, each

ANTARES has its own approval and an ad-

ditional flexible system approval.

If the systems have to be expanded at any

point that is not directly connected to the

housing, or if the housing has become too

small, the user can install a transition mod-

ule and link the next switching cabinet from

up to 20 m. If the reserve is exhausted, the

user can simply expand his system with a

few extra cards.

“At any time, we can add interface assem-

blies in another housing at a certain dis-

tance without having to isolate the PROFI-

BUS separately again,” explains Ciupka,

who adds: “If I need to expand the system,

I can do this directly on the remote I/O, as

it is the last unit on the PROFIBUS strand.

Using the PROFIBUS cable, I can move out

of the explosive area and install the second

slave where I need it. That is a huge advan-

tage for me.”

The fact that the system can work without iso-

lators does not just reduce costs, it also in-

creases the availability of the systems at Hen-

kel. With ANTARES, the user can work in an

explosive area immediately; an aspect which

should not be underestimated.

Photos:

Dominik Gierke / Henkel

Flexible and simple

to install, even in

the hazardous area

in zone 1.

10

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

USER REPORTS

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LEUTEX

FLUORESCENT LAMP SERIES SAFELY BRINGS LIGHT TO THE DARK

MOBILE COMPUTER MC 92N0

ex

EFFICIENT AND SECURE SCANNING OF BARCODES OR RFID

With the fluorescent lamp series LEUTEX,
BARTEC has expanded the product range for
the oil and gas market. Equipped with an Ex d
housing, they can be used in a diverse range
of applications. With its robust construction and

its reliability, LEUTEX is certified in line with
the explosion protection class IIC for gases and
temperature class T6 in various models. The
lamps are impact-resistant in accordance with
IK07 and have the protection class IP67.

PLEXO TCS

CONNECTION TECHNOLOGY MADE EASY WITH SELF-LIMITING HEATING TAPES

In PLEXO TCS, BARTEC has provided the mar-
ket with an innovative connection technology
for self-limiting heating tapes. The system's
construction allows a heating circuit to be

connected, linked and closed easily and safe-
ly. Maintenance work or later revisions can
also be carried out very flexibly.

With its high-performance processor and
memory, the MC 92N0

ex

is the fastest device of

its kind and enables even complex applications
to be run in order to simplify processes and

efficiently increase productivity. International
approvals such as IECEx, ATEX and UL certif-
icates ensure that this powerful and robust
hand-held solution can be used worldwide.

JUST THE

TOOL!

BARTEC provides

safety: Innovative products

as reliable aids

11

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

PRODUCTS

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If you want to be successful worldwide,

you have to be represented worldwide, too.

Thanks to its international network of

around 40 sales subsidiaries, BARTEC can

operate locally anywhere, including

now on the sixth continent.

ugby games in Australia and New Zealand are an exciting spectacle for the new-

comer. No punches are pulled in this game, sometimes literally in the annual

“State of Origin” tournament, where it’s every man for himself. Whilst European

footballers play elegant passes and get stretchered off the field with their faces twisted in

agony after the slightest foul, players down under soldier on even after head injuries. After

all, the people here are known for doing many things a bit differently.

R

TAKING A

FOOTHOLD

DOWN UNDER

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

Illustration: Frank W

eidenfelder

, Rose Pistola / Photos: ©iStockphoto.com / oversnap / samxmeg / GlobalP / travellinglight

12

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

INTERNATIONAL

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BARTEC Australia is prepared for the devel-

opment and is concentrating on these sectors.

The company is also working together here

with wholesalers who have supply contracts

with the most important mining, oil and gas

companies. This makes accessing the often

isolated sites of these firms easier.

The subsidiary is also aiming to grow in terms

of staff. This is linked to the goal of strengthen-

ing the presence in the en-

tire region, for example

with sales engineers or by

cooperating with distrib-

utors. Managing Director

of BARTEC Australia,

Chris Leahy, considers

the composition of the

personnel a great success. The team operates

partly from the headquarters in a suburb of

Melbourne and partly in Perth and Brisbane,

where regional sales managers acquire new

projects. Ellisco is responsible for this rep-

resentation in New Zealand. The history of

this company stretches all the way back to

1893, so one can be sure that they have a com-

prehensive knowledge of the local market

there, too.

This competitive spirit is also very apparent

in the economy. Here there is often jostling

between individual states, for example over

relevant laws and regulations. For BARTEC,

this often leads to the challenge of having to

navigate a myriad of local laws and regula-

tions in different regions. There have been

efforts to standardise these, but the process

is far from complete. And away from the

political efforts at harmonisation, the Aus-

tralian economy keeps

rolling on. Mining is an

important economic

sector in both countries

and will remain so for

the foreseeable future.

This is mostly down to

continued strong eco-

nomic growth in China which requires huge

quantities of raw materials.

This means that there will be no lack of pro-

jects for the next five years for BARTEC Aus-

tralia in the mining sector, which promise

strong growth. More precisely, the focus for

the new sales subsidiary led by Chris Leahy

will be on coal, iron ore and the booming en-

ergy source of liquid natural gas (LNG).

GOOD

PROSPECTS FOR

BUSINESS

TAKING A

FOOTHOLD

DOWN UNDER

Chris Leahy

3 QUESTIONS FOR

What is the most important

goal that you have set as

Managing Director of BARTEC

Australia?

I want to build up an expert local

team and make BARTEC better

known as a reliable local support

partner. I see our technically

highly qualified and experienced

staff as our best asset in this.

What are the advantages of

having a locally based sales

subsidiary?

We are close to our clients and

know the particular require-

ments of the market in Australia

and New Zealand. Our approach

is always based on the individual

needs of the sector on which we

are focussing, as our customers

place a lot of value on the fact

that we really understand their

business.

What is your favourite

BARTEC product?

That’s a tough one; the BARTEC

product range has so many

innovative solutions. But I think

our mobile computers are pretty

exciting. As usual, we begin by

focussing on the various technical

features, but our customers soon

realise the possibilities that the

hand-held solutions offer them

in simplifying processes and effi-

ciently increasing productivity.

Managing Director,

BARTEC Australia

13

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

INTERNATIONAL

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Interview: Marius Schaub /// Photos: Heike Rost

Bridges

Building

Jan Rieks Zonderman enjoys finding the

right product for customer wishes.

The perfect prerequisite for the job of Director

of Automation Technology at BARTEC.

14

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

INSIDE

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PROFILE

Jan Rieks Zonderman

Job: Director of Automation Technology
Education: Electronic engineer, specialising in automation
Place of birth: Groningen, Netherlands
At BARTEC since: 2011
In Germany since: Summer 2013
What he likes about Germany: German thoroughness
Problem-solving strategy: Focus on the causes
For really big problems: Sleep on it
Favourite holiday destination: Southern France

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

e who does not want to just sell

products, but solutions for his

customers’ problems, has to

know the market. Jan Rieks Zonderman is

driven by the urge to build bridges between

supply and demand. His previous job in the

explosive sector was like a calling to him –

and so he came to BARTEC. Today, Zon-

derman leads the automation technology

division in Bad Mergentheim. For him, the

road to this position was a long one, literal-

ly. The Dutchman had already come to Ger-

many for work in 2007, returning to Hol-

land two years later. “Back then, the world

was a little bit smaller,” he recalls. Then

came BARTEC and the permanent move

to Germany, and the world became much

bigger. As head of automation, Zonderman

is responsible for I/O systems, visualisation

and mobile computing.

Even though this varied range of product sec-

tors means a diverse customer base, he knows

his branch. “I would never say ‘that’s new’

about a technology, for example!” That’s be-

cause Zonderman knows that in the process

industry, ‘new’  is synonymous with ‘risky’.

Instead of risk-taking, he instead encourag-

es trust among his customers, for example

by emphasising explosion protection certi-

H

fications or appropriate protocols for his

products. And he knows what always helps

to lessen the fear of the new: test trials, if

possible in real application environments.

Doesn’t so much work for explosion protec-

tion get monotonous at some stage? The usu-

ally relaxed Dutchman becomes unusually

agitated: “No, that’s an advantage! Our

whole work is focused on finding solutions

for explosion protection,” emphasises the

engineer. Anyone who questions Zonder-

man’s passion for all things electronic should

just hand him a few printed documents. “I

hate paperwork,” he admits. He wants it dig-

ital; that makes it so much easier.

At all product levels, things are often easiest

when you leave the unnecessary things out.

Zonderman recalls a very special technical

feature that was supposed to be originally

incorporated into one of his systems. After

several tests, however, he came out against

it: “I found the technology interesting, but

it was too intelligent and therefore too com-

plex.” So the requirements were implement-

ed in a simpler way. The man simply lives

for the process industry, where nothing is

more important than reliability. “And that

means keep it simple. Simple is important!”

Who could disagree with that?

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

15

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

INSIDE

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Illustration: ©iStockphoto.com / axllll / Pingebat / Frank W

eidenfelder

, Rose Pistola

A SENSE

Valuable experiences gained in internships abroad

FOR THE INTERNATIONAL

16

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

A HELPING HAND

background image

To mark 25 years of awarding the Young Mana-

gers Development Programme prize , BARTEC

CFO Heiko Laubheimer (centre) welcomed com-

pany representatives and current and former prize

winners to BARTEC.

BARTEC has supported the work of the Young Managers Development Programme for many
years. One special project here is the annual awarding of a four-week overseas internship as a
prize to one student each from selected business high schools in the Main-Tauber region. This
year, the initiative is celebrating its 25

th

anniversary.

iving potential young managers ex-

perience on the way was the moti-

vation 25 years ago to start a special

education project. The Young Managers De-

velopment Programme first awarded the

prize in 1988 to outstanding students from

business high schools in Bad Mergent-

heim, Tauberbischofsheim and Wertheim.

BARTEC was the first company to sponsor

the internship in Bad Mergentheim in 1988,

assuming all costs. In 2013, BARTEC is

sponsoring the overseas internship for the

8

th

time.

The annual awarding of a four-week overseas

internship to students has seen 62 young

people honoured in that time. They have

taken the opportunity to collect practical

experience in the overseas branches of re-

gional businesses in 17 different countries.

In addition to destinations in Europe, in-

terns have also been sent to North and South

America and even to China.

At BARTEC, education and the prize are not

seen as costs, but rather as a good investment

for the future, according to Daniela Deubel,

Director of Global Corporate Communica-

tions at BARTEC: “In the internship, the fo-

cus is on giving the interns the chance to get

a sniff of a real business, gain a good insight

into the everyday work of the company and

to get to know the complex processes that

go on there.” It also allows the internation-

ally active safety technology provider to

pursue yet another goal: “We see this in-

volvement as our duty to the region and its

young people. We want the constantly

G

growing internationalisation of business to

be printed onto their conciousness.”

At the same time, BARTEC seeks to moti-

vate the youngsters to gain a more interna-

tional outlook and to improve their under-

standing of other cultures. This does not

just involve the perfect mastery of foreign

languages, but also dealing with other men-

talities in order to understand them, ex-

plains Daniela Deubel: “In an age of glo-

balisation, the sense for the international is

in demand and intercultural expertise be-

longs to the basic skills.”

One of the lucky winners is Leonie Burkert.

Next year, she will be able to spend four

weeks abroad getting to know the world of

work. The prize winner will spend her in-

ternship at BARTEC’s Spanish subsidiary

near Barcelona. Like most of our interns, she

will stay with a family. “I’m already looking

forward to getting to know the Spanish way

of life with my host family and to the many

diverse tasks that I will able to do at BARTEC,”

says Leonie. The positive impressions, both

with the family and at work, will help Leonie

to gain a more international perspective and

help her secure a better foothold in the busi-

ness environment in future.

The initiative marked its 25

th

anniversary with

a celebration at BARTEC in Bad Mergent-

heim. In a podium discussion, former interns

and those who had just returned from abroad

joined company representatives and Rolf

Hammer, one of the founders, in looking back

over 25 successful years.

17

BARTEC INSIGHT 1.2013

A HELPING HAND

background image

Illustration: Frank W

eidenfelder

, Rose Pistola / Photo cover inside: ©iStockphoto.com / T

ommL

Within just 0.2 milliseconds, the green pet-

als on the individual flowers of the Canadi-

an dogwood make room for the pollen

leaves under high mechanical tension with

their stamens containing pollen. They reach

speeds of around 6.7 m/s, where the maxi-

mum acceleration is around 2,200 times the

force of gravity. The power with which the

pollen leaves are shot out is even greater.

The highest speed recorded is 3.1 m/s, with

the pollen spores being shot out 2.5 cm.

The mantis shrimp smashes its prey by in-

terlocking parts of its exoskeleton and tens-

ing its muscles before releasing its grabbing

arms forwards in an explosive movement.

The club arm reaches speeds of 23 m/s, or

almost 83 km/h. The acceleration forces in-

volved are equal to 8,000 times the force of

gravity. For comparison: a blink of the hu-

man eye is about 40 slower. The impact of

these club arms is powerful enough to

smash the shells and armour of marine an-

imals. Experts have also reported incidents

where the animals were able to break the

glass in aquariums. The force of the impact

is similar to that of a bullet from a pistol.

The squirting cucumber uses a shooting

mechanism similar to that of a shotgun to

squirt its seeds 10 to 12 metres away. The

fruit consists of three misshapen carpels that

have grown together and form an empty

cavity. This is filled with the carpel sides, pla-

centas and seeds. As the seeds ripen, the

filled or swollen tissue is under very high

pressure; any movement can cause it to

squirt. A ring-shaped breaking point forms

where the pendicel is attached, which releas-

es the fruit if touched.

TRIGGER-

HAPPY SQUIRTING

CUCUMBERS

LIGHTNING-

FAST BOXING

SHRIMP

EXPLODING

FLOWERS

AND FINALLY

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IMPRINT

Publisher

BARTEC Top Holding GmbH

Max-Eyth-Str. 16 . D-97980 Bad Mergentheim, Germany

Phone: + 49 7931 597-0 . Fax: + 49 7931 597-119

info@bartec.de . www.bartec.de

Editor in Chief (Liable for editorial content)

Daniela Deubel

Director of Global Corporate Communications

BARTEC Top Holding GmbH

Max-Eyth-Str. 16 . D-97980 Bad Mergentheim, Germany

Phone: + 49 7931 597-324 . Fax: + 49 7931 597-445

daniela.deubel@bartec.de . www.bartec.de

Printing

StieberDruck GmbH

Tauberstraße 35-41

D-97922 Lauda-Königshofen, Germany

Phone: + 49 9343 6205-0

Fax: + 49 9343 6205-55

info@stieberdruck.de . www.stieberdruck.de

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BARTEC

– THE WORLD OF

SAFE.T

®

TECHNOLOGY